Water Ways

Michael Sheridan
Oct 11, 2013

In "Water Ways," neighboring villages - one with access to water and one without - offer very different prospects to their residents. The farmers without water are stuck; unable to feed their families, they turn to work as day laborers. However, working a day job keeps them from solving their water problems. Down the road, villagers have easier access to water and have used assistance from the Afghan government's National Solidarity Program to improve their lives. Unfortunately, tensions could arise between these villages over access to water. "Water Ways" is one of ten shorts featured in "The Fruit of our Labor" - a collection of 10 Afghan-made documentary shorts that bring to life Afghans’ efforts to address their challenging social and economic conditions. These films, made by Afghans trained by Community Supported Film, provide a fresh perspective of Afghanistan beyond the relentless battlefront coverage of the western media. Community Supported Film strengthens the documentary storytelling capacity in countries where the dissemination of objective and accurate information is essential for effective development and conflict resolution. CSFilm trains local women and men in documentary filmmaking and video-journalism. The resulting stories, rooted in realities often unrepresented in the media, are used to influence local and international perspectives on sustainable solutions for a more peaceful and equitable world. For more information on "Water Ways", or "The Fruit of our Labor", please visit www.csfilm.org

Majeed Zarand

Director

Jawed Taiman

Editor

Majid Zarand

Sound

Ahmad Wahid Zaman

Sound

Community Supported Film

Producer

The Killid Group

Producer

The Woods Hole Film Festival / Woods Hole, Massachusetts /
Arlington Film Festival / Arlington, Massachusetts /
Southern Utah International Film Festival: DocUtah / St. George, Utah /
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